The Hunting Gun, set in the period immediately after the Second World War, is the story of a tragic love affair and its psychological impact - not only on the lovers themselves but on all those close to them. The narrative is related from three points of view: Saiko, the guilt-ridden mistress; Shoko, her pathetic, disillusioned daughter; and Midori, the sophisticated but unhappy wife of Shoko's lover. This triangle is focused on Josuke, the husband-lover whose lonely, insular existence is symbolized by the hunting gun. Inoue displays a remarkable understanding of the psyche and an innate flair for dramatic incident, as well as a keen sympathy for the social milieu of Ashiya, an exclusive suburb of the great commerical cities of Osaka and Kobe. At once a study of everyday personal relationships and of the social and historic circumstances they mirror, The Hunting Gun remains timely and universal - a classic of modern Japanese literature.
December 15, 1989  |  74 pages
Average Grade: 4.0/5    (switch to letter scale)
L/E Ratio: 75% Literature, 25% Entertainment
Tags:
Writing Quality:
Low High
Originality:
Low High

Addictiveness:
Low High
Movie Potential:
Low High

Re-readability:
Low High
Sequel Potential:
Low High
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